Liberation Requires Commitment, Solidarity, Hope, and Courage

02/20/2017By KimberleyCommunity, Cultural, Freedom, Political, Reconnection, Social, Social Justice
liberation
the impossible becomes possibility

 

In his writing on Liberation Psychology, Ignacio Martín-Baró writes,  ” . . . commitment, solidarity, hope, courage – all collective virtues only possible when people act in reference to others.”

When the focus is solely on individual trauma and other struggles, people disconnect and become self involved – distracted from the social, economic, political and philosophical underpinnings of the whole that we live in.

Underpinnings that are, more often than not, the very ground that individual trauma and struggle come from.

 

I was raped twice as a young woman, those acts are connected to our “rape culture,” which in turn connects to patriarchy. The healing itself became traumatic because it isolated me from the truth.

 

It wasn’t a matter of putting me in a room with other rape survivors, I did that too. All that did was isolate all of us as the victims, and the act of rape got defined as an aberration and not as a very real part of the culture.

How empowering it would have been back then to hear the truth, to learn the tools of resistance, and to work toward not only healing myself, but also to join with others to build the foundations for a new culture.

That’s powerful healing.
That’s liberation.

Something else that happens when the focus is only on the individual – other people’s suffering doesn’t register. Folks may be kind and helpful to people they encounter, but they are disconnected from the suffering of marginalized folks and from the conditions that make it possible for marginalization to even exist.

When they do get a glimpse of it, they feel overwhelmed because they have lived in the soup of an artificial reality constructed by white patriarchal culture – a culture that survives exactly because it does not foster using the tools of resistance and solidarity toward meaningful change. Or people pick up the tools of the patriarchy to resist – and as Audre Lorde warned, “the tools of the master will never dismantle the master’s house.”

For a long period in my life, I isolated with my own wounds. I barely knew how to heal myself and when I looked at the plight of others I felt a sense of helplessness and turned away.

It wasn’t until I ran into the writings of women like Audre Lorde and Angela Davis that the spark in me came alive. Their voices helped re-ignite that sense of “commitment, solidarity, hope and courage” that I got an inkling of as a child growing up in the socialist subculture of Argentina. There were many others, among them Ignacio Martín-Baró, that inspired and taught me.

I learned that what seems impossible, can become possibility. And from possibility, it can become the reality of liberation.

 

I’m working on a group offering that’s part teaching, part coaching, and based in experiential activities. I believe that we need to bring more than our mind in order to shift into a new way of being and doing. We need to bring our whole selves – our mind, our body with all its senses, our emotional ground, our intuition and instinct, our creativity – for meaningful change and for the possibility of liberation.

While that percolates, I’ll be offering 2-hour intensives for groups of 3 or more. Details soon!

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Conversation With Ericka Hines

02/01/2017By KimberleyFeral Wisdom

Ericka HinesEricka Hines was a delight to connect with!

The theme running through our conversation? Responsibility and Social Justice.

Did I just make that sound overly academic and dry? No way! – Ericka shares her wisdom with clarity, grace and a good dose of humor.

Those of us with privilege have a responsibility to listen, wrestle with our discomfort, and then act in service of truth and justice. Those of us who are marginalized/oppressed need to do the work of owning our sovereignty and dignity no matter what and stand for ourselves and others – a different kind of responsibility. And it’s not always that cut and dry –  forms of privilege can intersect with a marginalized identities. You can find out more of what Ericka has to say in her article Your Privilege is a Responsibility

I didn’t do justice to the depth of Ericka’s expertise around diversity, inclusion and leadership. I’m hoping she will come back later this year so we can dive into what diversity and inclusion truly mean for us in our personal and collective lives.

More about Ericka’s work.
Collaboration with Desiree Adaway in the class Diversity is an Asset

Enjoy!

 

Note: I considered doing a post about the interview instead – my inexperience with interviews is so plain! But Ericka’s part is gold, I didn’t want you to miss that. I’ve also committed to transparency as I continue to grow and learn with all of you. I remind myself that the idea of polish and perfection is its own kind of oppression.

You will hear references to Feral Compass – at the time of this interview I had not switched over to The Liberation Collective.

Next month we’ll connect with Kelly Diels! Learn about what Kelly calls the  Female Lifestyle Empowerment Brand and what it all has to do with finding liberation.

You can Pick My Brain!
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Big Changes & a New Offering

01/30/2017By KimberleyFeral Wisdom

Hi Folks!

I have an offer ready to go!

You can book a one hour session ($100) to pick my brain about issues around social justice and identity. Bring your questions around a certain focus and we’ll dig in!

I’m in the process of completely restructuring my business. The clarity I’ve gained over the last few months turning into reality bit by bit.

The new name is Kim McGill / The Liberation Collective — the “collective” part isn’t apparent yet. Still writing new about pages and putting together the services I’ll be offering.

And coming February 1: An interview with Erika Hines – she was a delight to connect with and very patient with my newbie interviewing skills.

The theme running through our conversation? Responsibility and Social Justice. Did I just make that sound overly academic and dry? No way! – Erika shares her inspiration and her know-how with clarity, grace and a good dose of humor.

The Hag: A Poem

01/18/2017By KimberleyFeral Wisdom

I wrote this poem in 2005 inspired by a quote from Clarissa Pinkola Estes and my belief that beneath all the toxic cultural conditioning, beneath all the old stories we tell about ourselves and others, there is an inherent power and wisdom. That’s what the old hag represents. She is us.

“They say there is an old woman who cn sing bones back to life, that she is the knucklebone between two worlds. Some claim to have seen her traveling south in a burnt out car with the back window shot out” – C.P.E.

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